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Emerald Ash Borer
 
 


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Emerald Ash Borer



Emerald Ash Borer
The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a nonnative invasive insect that has already killed millions of trees in Minnesota. In its native Asia, resistant trees and numerous predators keep the EAB population under control. Suspected to have arrived in North America via shipping crates in the Great Lakes, the Emerald Ash Borer was first identified in Michigan in 2002, and on their own spread about 12 miles per year.

Through firewood, EAB has spread further than they ever could on their own. EAB has been located in St Louis County and is likely to spread throughout the region.
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3 important things you can do to help slow and mitigate EAB's damage:

1) Do not transport firewood. Not even within Minnesota.
EAB larvae and pupae remain hidden beneath the bark of the tree getting chopped into firewood, and then emerges fully grown. If you've transported wood with EAB in it, you've now created a satellite population in a new location. The MN DNR is taking the EAB infestation seriously, so before you go camping, check out their guidelineson what firewood is safe.

2) Learn to identify Emerald Ash Borer and evidence of its presence. The Minnesota Extension has a step-by-step guide for identifying ash trees, the ash borer itself, and insect damage. Diseased trees may be treated or removed.

3) Begin planting replacement species. For black ash growing in moist forests, consider tamarack, white cedar, mountain ash, and yellow birch. For black ash in upland forests, consider basswood, quaking aspen, oak, white pine, and white spruce. For green ash along river floodplains, consider dogwood, juneberry, or some of our native willows.






For more info on the Emerald Ash Borer:

Emerald Ash Borer ID & Action Guide

MN DNR Emerald Ash Borer


 
     
   

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